Daily Archives: January 31, 2010

The History of the English Bible: Bibliography

I’m going to include a list of resources I used and felt were helpful in doing this series.

The book The journey from Texts to Translations: The Orgin and Development of the Bible was most helpful and where most of the information for this series came from.

The Journey from Texts to Translations: The Orgin and Development of the Bible/ Paul D. Wegner/Baker/2004/ISBN: 0801027993

Some information also came from:

The King James Controversy: Can You Trust Modern translations/James R. White/ Bethany House/2009/ISBN:0764206052

I also relied on notes from my Hermeneutics class at Boyce College

To see the accusations against modern translations got to AV1611.com’s KJV Controversy page. I just ask that you research the things that they claim

Bible page pictures came from newtestamentchurch.org

openscriptures.org has the manuscript comparator
which allows you to see the differences in the New Testament manuscripts.

bible-researcher.com has many articles on scripture and very detailed descriptions of modern bible translations click on the 20th and 21st century versions to read opinions on the modern translations.

Bible Gateway and Bible study tools have bibles online to read and compare.

Links for:

RSV and NRSV
RSV preface
NRSV preface
National Council of Churches
NRSV website
NRSV online bible browser
RSV online bible browser

NASB
Lockman Foundation

The Living Bible
The Living Bible at Google books

NIV, NIRV, TNIV
BiblicaNKJV
Thomas Nelson publishers of the NKJV

NCV
World Bible Translation Center

NLT
Tyndale House publishers of the NLT
NLT website

The Message
Nav Press publishers of the Message

HCSB
Broadman and Holman publishers of the HCSB
HCSB websit

NET
bible.org
NET bible page

Koinonia is a blog hosted by Zondervan Academics and hasmany posts written by translators about translating passages.
Better Bibles blog is a blog contributed to by several translators and it agan discusses ways things were and are translated.

The journey from Texts to Translations: The Orgin and Development of the Bible

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The History of the English Bible Part 27: NET (2005)

The New English Translation came about because of a copyright problem ran into by the ministry organization bible.org. They started in 1993  with the mission of making free bible study resources. In 1995 they realized that eventually if they continued making their resources available on one website they would violate the copyright of the bible versions they were using. So what do you do? They commissioned their own bible translation. A team of more than 25 scholars worked on the translation. They used the best available Hebrew, Greek, And Aramic texts. The thing that makes me mention them though is their translator notes. They have 60,932 translation notes in their bible. These notes show you the textual basis and why they used certain words.

This bible went through a nine year review that they called beta testing. As it was being worked on, it was available online for review and suggestions.

The first Beta edition was available in 1998 and a second edition became available in 2003. In 2005 the first edition of the NET was released. This bible is available online at www.bible.org plus a much larger description is available their also.

John 3:16 NET

For this is the way God loved the world: He gave his one and only Son, so that everyone who believes in him will not perish but have eternal life.

The Lord’s Prayer from the NET Bible (Matthew 6:9-13)

So pray this way:

Our Father in heaven,may your name be honored, may your kingdom come,
may your will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us today our daily bread, and forgive us our debts, as we ourselves have forgiven our debtors. And do not lead us into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.


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The History of the English Bible Part 26: HCSB (2004)

In 1998 the people at Broadman and Holman publishers were seeking to buy the copyright of an already existing conservative translation for use in their publishing projects. Broadman and Holman is the trade books division of Lifeway Christian Resources of the Southern Baptist Convention. After problems getting the copyrights they needed, they contacted Arthur Farstad, a professor at Dallas Theological Seminary and former general edition for the NKJV. They asked him to do a fresh translation based on the Nestle-Aland text. Farstad passed away five months after beginning the project. They asked Edwin Blum, another professor at Dallas Theological Seminary to take over general editorship.

The HCSB is a literal translation that calls itself “Optimal Equivalence”. Basically they translated as literal as possible except where that would have affected clarity. When understanding would be afeected they translated for clarity and placed the literal translation in a footnote. On gender related Issues they went with the Colorado springs guidelines for gender related language. Traditional theology terms have been retained (justification, sanctification, etc.). Nouns and pronouns refering to divinity are capitalized. They used brackets to indicate words added for English understanding.

John 3:16 HCSB

“For God loved  the world in this way: He gave His One and Only  Son, so that everyone who believes in Him will not perish but have eternal life.

The Lord’s Prayer from the HCSB (Matthew 6:9-13)

“Therefore, you should pray like this:

Our Father in heaven,

Your name be honored as holy.

Your kingdom come.

Your will be done

on earth as it is in heaven.

Give us today our daily bread.

And forgive us our debts,

as we also have forgiven our debtors.

And do not bring us into temptation,

but deliver us from the evil one.

[For Yours is the kingdom and the power

and the glory forever. Amen.]


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